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Advice, tips & news for farmers who want to 'work smarter'

Learning from Australian farmers for long-term storage of silage

Posted by Sam Searle on Mar 14, 2019 9:43:00 AM

 

Did you hear about the Australian beef farmer who dug into a 26-year-old silage pit last year, at the height of the NSW drought?

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Topics: Silage & Winter Feed Handling, Silage Making Tips

The true value of a wrapped bale handler

Posted by Sam Searle on Jan 16, 2019 8:06:56 AM

We all know rips and tears on wrapped silage bales are bad and lead to decreased feed value, with extreme cases rendering the bale useless as aerobic spoilage and mold growth makes it too dangerous to feed out.

But just how much do rips and tears on silage bales cost our farmers? Read on to find out!

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Topics: Bale Handling & Storage, Silage Making Tips, attachments

Top Tedding Tips

Posted by Sam Searle on Dec 21, 2017 12:20:00 PM

Tedding Tips

 

Why Tedder?

Tedding hay is an essential part of the hay making process as it speeds up the drying of the hay, this in turn reduces moisture rot once hay is baled and eliminates the possibility of spontaneous combustion of bales due to bacterial decomposition of grass. This is all before mentioning the fact it gets the job done sooner!

 

When to Tedder?

Hay mowen early in the morning can be tedded in the same afternoon as long as the mowen swath is dry on the top surface. It may require a second tedding the next day to speed up the drying process.

Tedding can be used anytime during field curing, and it typically can reduce your field-curing time by up to 12 hours. Some experts indicate tedding can increase hay drying rates by 20 to 40 percent in certain areas.

Initial tedding should be performed after a brief wilting period following a morning cutting while the hay is still moist (two to four hours). In very damp conditions, tedding may need to be done immediately after cutting. A second pass is usually done the next day, and the hay is raked and baled that afternoon.

Things to consider when tedding alfalfa, lucerne & similar crops

Some crops such as alfalfa & lucerne are often damaged by tedding, this is because it has been left too long after mowing till tedding & the leaf has dried then subsequently shattered when tedded, to overcome this its suggested that tedding is done as soon as possible after mowing while the crop is still wet & damp, at this stage tedding will not affect the crop & the nutritional value of the crop is retained.

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Topics: Hay Making Tips, Silage Making Tips

Cut At The Right Time To Get More Out Of Your Hay

Posted by Sam Searle on Oct 11, 2017 10:51:16 AM

It's all in the timing!

The best time to cut grass for hay is when the leaves are fully developed but just before the seed heads appear, this is the stage at which you will be able to make the most nutritous hay for your stock.

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Topics: Tips, Hacks & How To's, Hay Making Tips, Silage Making Tips